Accreditation of Dog Courses

Nov 30 / Jay Gurden
There are so many dog courses available to us online that, to the person starting out wanting to learn more about dogs, it can seem like a minefield picking out which education provider and which courses to go for. Accreditation of dog courses can help point us towards the quality canine education we are looking for.

The boom in online education is both a good and not such a good thing. It has brought excellent education, dog related or otherwise, into the reach of many more than could ever find the time or money required for more formal or completely in-person education. It has also however opened up the world of providing education in a massive range of subjects, dogs included, to many as well. The quality of courses available has a massive degree of variability.

So how do we know that the course we select is of good quality and the information in it valid? Accreditation of dog courses means that, to be offered with that accreditation, the courses have to meet the standards of the accrediting body. The course has to undergo a process of assessment. Anything that has to go through a quality check stands an increased chance of being good quality and valid information. Other courses may contain excellent and scientifically valid information, but there is no way of knowing that without spending money, and already understanding the difference between the excellent, up to date and ethical knowledge and the substandard outdated materials.

Accreditation of dog courses is also a great thing for the canine professional world. As of the time of writing, the industry is unregulated. There are virtually no real requirements to fulfil to work as a canine professional. While this means that any one of us can live our dreams of working with dogs, it also means that canine professionals vary widely in their approaches, standards, and consideration for the well-being of the dogs in their charge. A growing number of canine professionals already working within the industry are of the opinion that the unregulated status of the dog world will change in the years to come, and that standards and regulations will be put into place to ensure that canine welfare and well-being is at the heart of the industry. This places accreditation of dog courses as an important factor to keep in mind.

Kind, ethical, and educated dog people can all agree that putting the dog’s health and well-being, both physical and mental, at the centre of our minds and of our approaches to working with them can only be a positive thing. When looking for a new learning source, remembering to check for accreditation of dog courses can help reassure us that we are finding quality dog-centred education that will prepare us to help the dogs around us.

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